Accurate DIY LC Meter
Here is LC Meter that you can build yourself, you can find the schematic, board design also included and description for building from Phil Rice VK3BHR

Another site sell this LC Meter and looks neat. It would help to identify the components easily especially for radio amateur. Try to get it one.
DIY LC METER

" This is one of the most accurate and simplest LC inductance / capacitance Meters that one can find, yet one that you can easily build yourself. This LC Meter allows to measure incredibly small inductances starting from 10nH to 1000nH, 1uH to 1000uH, 1mH to 100mH and capacitance from 0.1pF up to 900nF. LC Meter's circuit uses an auto ranging system so that way you do not need to spend time selecting ranges manually. Another neat function is reset switch that will reset the initial inductance / capacitance, making sure that the final readings of the LC Meter are as accurate as possible."
Link : http://electronics-diy.com/lc_meter.php

Accurate DIY LC Meter
Here is LC Meter that you can build yourself, you can find the schematic, board design also included and description for building from Phil Rice VK3BHR

Another site sell this LC Meter and looks neat. It would help to identify the components easily especially for radio amateur. Try to get it one.
DIY LC METER

" This is one of the most accurate and simplest LC inductance / capacitance Meters that one can find, yet one that you can easily build yourself. This LC Meter allows to measure incredibly small inductances starting from 10nH to 1000nH, 1uH to 1000uH, 1mH to 100mH and capacitance from 0.1pF up to 900nF. LC Meter's circuit uses an auto ranging system so that way you do not need to spend time selecting ranges manually. Another neat function is reset switch that will reset the initial inductance / capacitance, making sure that the final readings of the LC Meter are as accurate as possible."
Link : http://electronics-diy.com/lc_meter.php

LCD Flat panel TV troubleshooting guide by Bud Martin 

Troubleshooting LCD flat panel TV.

This is the basic guide that can be applied to most LCD flat panel TV.
First, try unplugging it from the outlet for about an hour to see if the TV will reset itself since the minute
the TV is plugged into the wall, the power supply and processor will be running 24/7 and the EPROM can
get corrupted by spikes and surges. Try using good quality surge suppressor to see if it will help if it
happen often.

Look for burnt brown hot spots on the circuit boards, capacitors with leaking/bulging top or seals. Loose wires and connectors. Blown fuses.

Notes: We are dealing with high voltage that can kill you! so if you are not sure what you are
doing, please have it fixed by the pro that has proper tools and safety equipment. Try to use GFI
outlet and isolation transformer when work around the TV set and DO NOT DEFEAT THE GROUND
PIN OF THE OUTLET/POWER CORD.

Back ground on LCD TV: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LCD_television

1) The power supply module (There are 4 regulated output voltages:- Standby 5vdc, switched
5vdc, 12~16vdc, and 24vdc).


The power supply converts the 120/230vac 50/60Hz into DC, then the high frequency (50~100kHz)
switching circuits convert it back to AC but at high frequency which allows the power supply to use
smaller and much lighter weight transformers (Ferrite core instead of heavy iron core), then this high
frequency AC voltage is fed to the rectifier Diodes to get the DC output and filtered by DC filter capacitors
that must have low ESR (Equivalent Series Resistance), if general purpose electrolytic caps are use, they
will fail within a year or less due to high ESR.

The power supply has Standby 5vdc (5VSB, this is a MUST have before anything else will work,
when this voltage is not present, there will be no any indicator light on the front panel) which is
always on the minute the TV is plugged into the AC outlet, so it is on 24/7 and that is why the power
supply will fail even though you may use the a TV not very often. It will see all the voltage spikes and
surges 24/7. 

This 5vdc is used to power the Processor and the Infrared remote receiver module which will be waiting
for the command from the remote control or from the power switch, when the Power on command is
received, the Processor will send the turn on signal (3.3~5vdc) to the power supply module (PSON pin) to the switch on the main 5vdc for the rest of the logic and Tuner circuits, 12~16vdc for the sound
amplifiers (mostly Class D amplifier for efficiency and small size) and for the T-CON board (interface
board between the LCD panel and the Logic board), and 24vdc for the Back lights inverter board (if there is no 24vdc then no back light).

Common failures:
Blown main AC fuse due to shorted out Diodes, transistors.
Bad capacitors leaking or bulging tops: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capacitor_plague 
Shorted Diodes, transistors in the DC output side.

Testing the power supply output with dummy load:
24vdc testing: Disconnect the wires that go to the inverter board first. You can use two #1157 (using
both Lo & Hi filaments by paralleling them at the base) car light bulbs connected in series so they can
handle the 24vdc, this will put light load (about 70w) on the 24vdc output, the voltage out should be
steady at 24vdc (+/-2v), if not, the power supply has regulation problem. 
12vdc testing: disconnect the 12vdc TV load from the power supply board and attach one #1157 (using
just the Hi filament), the 12vdc output should stay at 12v (+/-1v), if not, the power supply has regulation
problem.

You should see the lamps go on when the TV power switch is ON and go OFF when the TV is powered
OFF.

2) Main Logic board (It has Processor, Tuner, Sound Processor, Sources selector, Power
amplifiers for speakers, interface port to the T-CON board for pictures). 

This logic board sends out the turn on signals (3.3~5vdc) to turn on the rest of the Power supply module
(Switched main 5vdc, 12~16vdc, and 24vdc), Inverter backlight ON (if no back light on command then
there is no back lights), 
Logic board supplies 5 or 12vdc to T-CON board B+ pin through switched transistor if T-CON board does
not get the voltage from the logic board, you will get white/gray glowing screen without pictures.
Back lights Dimming (PWM) control signal.

3) Back lights Inverter board. Its job is to provide the drive voltage for the CCFL (Cold Cathode
Fluorescent Lamp) to give white light for the screen.

This board is fed by the switched 24vdc (VBL) from the power supply module, it also get the Back lights
on (BL on) control signal and the Dimming (Dim/PWM/) signal from the logic board. So for it to work, it
needs 24vdc and the BL_ON signal.
Common failures:
Blown surface mounted fuses due to shorted transistors/ICs, Transformers.
Bad capacitors.

4) The T-CON (Timing Control or LCD controller) board (on the LCD panel assembly). It transfer the
universal image signal of TTL and LVDS signal to specific TFT (Thin Film Transistor) LCD.

This is the interface board that talks to the Logic board and the LCD panel to produce pictures on the
screen. White/gray glowing screen when it fails or not getting the voltage from the logic board (the 5 or 12vdc is supplied by switched transistor on the logic board). Notes: T-CON board is mounted under the
metal cover shield.
Common failures: 
Scrambled pictures, Lines, multiple pictures, color smears/blotches, rolling pictures after warm up.
Blown surface mounted fuse.
No pictures, very dark screen almost like there is no backlights.

5) LCD panel assembly to display pictures. The LCD pixels will block or unblock the back lights
from the back of the panel to the front of the panel. This is the most expensive part of the TV, it
will be more than the TV is worth.


As you can see, you must have all the above Voltages and signals for the TV to work properly. This may
help you narrowing down the bad modules instead of buying the wrong module just to find out later that it
did not solve the problem. Hope this will help you out.

Sound problem:
Let verify first to narrow down to where the problem can be. First, check the on screen sound set up
menu to make sure the speakers are not set to OFF. If the setting is OK, then attach the powered PC
speakers to the Audio Line out RCA jacks to see if you can get the sound there, if you do, then the
problem can be in the power amp circuits, if you do not get the sound at RCA jacks, then the problem can be in the sound processor circuit.

To get the sound repair, it can be from $150 and up, so if you can put up with using the good set of Powered PC speakers which actually give better sound than the tiny speakers inside the TV, I would keep using it that way, you may want to find out if the on screen sound setup will allow you to set the audio line out to be VARIABLE which means the sound output feeding the PC speakers can be varied using the TV remote control, then all you have to do is to set the PC volume to about half way up and set the TV volume to what ever you want.




 

 


LCD Flat panel TV troubleshooting guide by Bud Martin 

Troubleshooting LCD flat panel TV.

This is the basic guide that can be applied to most LCD flat panel TV.
First, try unplugging it from the outlet for about an hour to see if the TV will reset itself since the minute
the TV is plugged into the wall, the power supply and processor will be running 24/7 and the EPROM can
get corrupted by spikes and surges. Try using good quality surge suppressor to see if it will help if it
happen often.

Look for burnt brown hot spots on the circuit boards, capacitors with leaking/bulging top or seals. Loose wires and connectors. Blown fuses.

Notes: We are dealing with high voltage that can kill you! so if you are not sure what you are
doing, please have it fixed by the pro that has proper tools and safety equipment. Try to use GFI
outlet and isolation transformer when work around the TV set and DO NOT DEFEAT THE GROUND
PIN OF THE OUTLET/POWER CORD.

Back ground on LCD TV: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LCD_television

1) The power supply module (There are 4 regulated output voltages:- Standby 5vdc, switched
5vdc, 12~16vdc, and 24vdc).


The power supply converts the 120/230vac 50/60Hz into DC, then the high frequency (50~100kHz)
switching circuits convert it back to AC but at high frequency which allows the power supply to use
smaller and much lighter weight transformers (Ferrite core instead of heavy iron core), then this high
frequency AC voltage is fed to the rectifier Diodes to get the DC output and filtered by DC filter capacitors
that must have low ESR (Equivalent Series Resistance), if general purpose electrolytic caps are use, they
will fail within a year or less due to high ESR.

The power supply has Standby 5vdc (5VSB, this is a MUST have before anything else will work,
when this voltage is not present, there will be no any indicator light on the front panel) which is
always on the minute the TV is plugged into the AC outlet, so it is on 24/7 and that is why the power
supply will fail even though you may use the a TV not very often. It will see all the voltage spikes and
surges 24/7. 

This 5vdc is used to power the Processor and the Infrared remote receiver module which will be waiting
for the command from the remote control or from the power switch, when the Power on command is
received, the Processor will send the turn on signal (3.3~5vdc) to the power supply module (PSON pin) to the switch on the main 5vdc for the rest of the logic and Tuner circuits, 12~16vdc for the sound
amplifiers (mostly Class D amplifier for efficiency and small size) and for the T-CON board (interface
board between the LCD panel and the Logic board), and 24vdc for the Back lights inverter board (if there is no 24vdc then no back light).

Common failures:
Blown main AC fuse due to shorted out Diodes, transistors.
Bad capacitors leaking or bulging tops: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capacitor_plague 
Shorted Diodes, transistors in the DC output side.

Testing the power supply output with dummy load:
24vdc testing: Disconnect the wires that go to the inverter board first. You can use two #1157 (using
both Lo & Hi filaments by paralleling them at the base) car light bulbs connected in series so they can
handle the 24vdc, this will put light load (about 70w) on the 24vdc output, the voltage out should be
steady at 24vdc (+/-2v), if not, the power supply has regulation problem. 
12vdc testing: disconnect the 12vdc TV load from the power supply board and attach one #1157 (using
just the Hi filament), the 12vdc output should stay at 12v (+/-1v), if not, the power supply has regulation
problem.

You should see the lamps go on when the TV power switch is ON and go OFF when the TV is powered
OFF.

2) Main Logic board (It has Processor, Tuner, Sound Processor, Sources selector, Power
amplifiers for speakers, interface port to the T-CON board for pictures). 

This logic board sends out the turn on signals (3.3~5vdc) to turn on the rest of the Power supply module
(Switched main 5vdc, 12~16vdc, and 24vdc), Inverter backlight ON (if no back light on command then
there is no back lights), 
Logic board supplies 5 or 12vdc to T-CON board B+ pin through switched transistor if T-CON board does
not get the voltage from the logic board, you will get white/gray glowing screen without pictures.
Back lights Dimming (PWM) control signal.

3) Back lights Inverter board. Its job is to provide the drive voltage for the CCFL (Cold Cathode
Fluorescent Lamp) to give white light for the screen.

This board is fed by the switched 24vdc (VBL) from the power supply module, it also get the Back lights
on (BL on) control signal and the Dimming (Dim/PWM/) signal from the logic board. So for it to work, it
needs 24vdc and the BL_ON signal.
Common failures:
Blown surface mounted fuses due to shorted transistors/ICs, Transformers.
Bad capacitors.

4) The T-CON (Timing Control or LCD controller) board (on the LCD panel assembly). It transfer the
universal image signal of TTL and LVDS signal to specific TFT (Thin Film Transistor) LCD.

This is the interface board that talks to the Logic board and the LCD panel to produce pictures on the
screen. White/gray glowing screen when it fails or not getting the voltage from the logic board (the 5 or 12vdc is supplied by switched transistor on the logic board). Notes: T-CON board is mounted under the
metal cover shield.
Common failures: 
Scrambled pictures, Lines, multiple pictures, color smears/blotches, rolling pictures after warm up.
Blown surface mounted fuse.
No pictures, very dark screen almost like there is no backlights.

5) LCD panel assembly to display pictures. The LCD pixels will block or unblock the back lights
from the back of the panel to the front of the panel. This is the most expensive part of the TV, it
will be more than the TV is worth.


As you can see, you must have all the above Voltages and signals for the TV to work properly. This may
help you narrowing down the bad modules instead of buying the wrong module just to find out later that it
did not solve the problem. Hope this will help you out.

Sound problem:
Let verify first to narrow down to where the problem can be. First, check the on screen sound set up
menu to make sure the speakers are not set to OFF. If the setting is OK, then attach the powered PC
speakers to the Audio Line out RCA jacks to see if you can get the sound there, if you do, then the
problem can be in the power amp circuits, if you do not get the sound at RCA jacks, then the problem can be in the sound processor circuit.

To get the sound repair, it can be from $150 and up, so if you can put up with using the good set of Powered PC speakers which actually give better sound than the tiny speakers inside the TV, I would keep using it that way, you may want to find out if the on screen sound setup will allow you to set the audio line out to be VARIABLE which means the sound output feeding the PC speakers can be varied using the TV remote control, then all you have to do is to set the PC volume to about half way up and set the TV volume to what ever you want.




 

 


This is a tutorial that I got from the forum and looked to be very useful for troubleshooting. Feel free to read and learn :
(Bud Martin): Basic LCD Troubleshooting Guides

First if you can, try the monitor with other PC first to make sure it is not the PC problem.
Notes: We are dealing with high voltage that can kill you! so if you are not sure what you are doing,
please have it fixed by the pro that has proper tools and safety equipment. Try to use GFI outlet and
isolation transformer when work around the TV set and DO NOT DEFEAT THE GROUND PIN OF THE
OUTLET/POWER CORD.

The monitor will have at least 2 circuits boards, one board will be the logic board where the video cable
from PC is attached to, the second board used in most monitors today is the Power supply/backlight
inverter board combinations. Some monitors will have separate power supply module and backlight
inverter board. 


The monitor should be connected to the running PC otherwise it will go into standby mode.
The operations of each board:

1) The Power supply board: 
It takes the 120vac 60Hz and converts it to high voltage DC (around 160~170vdc filtered by the 80~150uf
250~450vdc cap) by the bridge rectifiers to be used by the switching power supply circuits that converts
this DC voltage into high frequency (around 50~100 KHz) AC for driving the step down transformer. 


The outputs (usually 2 outputs) of the transformer will be rectified by the diodes to produce the regulated 5vdc
for the logic board, and regulated 12~20vdc (12vdc is usually for screen up to 17inch, 16~24vdc for
18~24 inch screen).

The power supply circuits are always on (unless the monitor uses the power switch that actually
disconnects the power from the outlet which is rarely used these days) which means that it is running
24/7 using the monitor or not, any spikes and surge will be fed into the monitor power supply.

Common problems: 
Blown fuses, bad caps (leaking/bulging tops or bottom seals, please note that bad cap may look normal
but it can have high ESR (Equivalent Series Resistance). The DC filter cap should be low ESR type for
using in the switching power supply; general purpose electrolytic types will not last very long in switching
power supply circuits. Poor solder joints, over heated components.

Testing:
Plug the monitor in but do not activate the power switch so the backlight inverter circuits will be off. Check
the 5vdc and the 12~24vdc to make sure they are OK. They should be tested with the load, you can use
6V 1A (6watts) lamp for the 5vdc, and car lamps such as 1157 (12v 8watts lo/26watts high) turn signal
brake lamp using high filament connection for testing the 12~18vdc (or use two 1157 in series for
19~24vdc) for the backlight inverter circuits.  


If the power supplies are working, the output voltages should be steady at the rated voltages. The power
supply will go into shut down if it detects too much current draw due to false in the power supply or short
circuits in the backlight inverter or in the logic board.

2) The backlight inverter circuits:
It takes the 12~24vdc and converts it to high frequency AC to drive the inverter transformers CCFL (Cold
Cathode Fluorescent Lamp) assemblies. The transformers will drive the CCFL by applying the start up
voltage (around 1500~2000v), when the CCFL start conducting, the voltage will drop down to about
500~800v. 


The inverter has detection circuits to detect open circuit if the lamp is not attached or does not fire up after
the start up voltage is applied, it will go into shut down. It will also shut down if the lamps draw too much
current due to ages (when lamp gets old it will draw more current). 


The inverter gets two signals from the logic board, one is the backlight ON/OFF signal, the other one is
the Dimming signal for the lamps. 


Common problems:
Bad filter caps, resonant caps (in the inverter output circuits), blown transistors/IC, shorted or open
transformer winding.
Testing:
You should have spare lamps for testing the inverter circuits. You can get lamps from www.lcdparts.net

3) Logic board:
The logic board get the signals from the VGA (ANALOG) or DVI (DIGITAL) and processes them and feed
them to the LCD panel T-CON (Timing Controller) board on the back of the LCD panel.
It also sends out two signals (backlight ON/OFF and Dimming) to the inverter circuits when the monitor is
on and getting the signals from the PC. 


If the logic board does not get the signal from the PC, it will put monitor into standby mode.
The 5vdc feeding it is converted to 3.3v, 1.8vdc by the switching buck converters to run the processor.
The logic board also sends the 5vd or 12vdc power for the T-CON board, if the voltage is not there, you
will see white/grey glowing screen only.  


Not much repair you can do on the logic board unless you have the full service manual and surface
mount repair station.

4) CCFL and Inverter circuits testing:
If you don not have the inverter and lamp tester boxes (see www.lcdparts.net), you may be able to do a
simple test by using these steps: 


If the screen flashes on for a second, you can disconnect all the lamp connectors and connect it into one
of the transformer output connector and see if you will see the flash on the screen, if you do, then try it
with another transformer output connector to see if it also get the flash on the screen.  


Repeat the procedure with other 3 lamps. If all the lamps do flash on for seconds then more likely the
lamps are OK. If lamp only flash on one of the transformer output then you will know that the problem in
that transformer inverter circuits. 


If none of the lamps flash at all then the problem is in the inverter circuits, power supply, or not getting the
on signal from the logic board.


This is a tutorial that I got from the forum and looked to be very useful for troubleshooting. Feel free to read and learn :
(Bud Martin): Basic LCD Troubleshooting Guides

First if you can, try the monitor with other PC first to make sure it is not the PC problem.
Notes: We are dealing with high voltage that can kill you! so if you are not sure what you are doing,
please have it fixed by the pro that has proper tools and safety equipment. Try to use GFI outlet and
isolation transformer when work around the TV set and DO NOT DEFEAT THE GROUND PIN OF THE
OUTLET/POWER CORD.

The monitor will have at least 2 circuits boards, one board will be the logic board where the video cable
from PC is attached to, the second board used in most monitors today is the Power supply/backlight
inverter board combinations. Some monitors will have separate power supply module and backlight
inverter board. 


The monitor should be connected to the running PC otherwise it will go into standby mode.
The operations of each board:

1) The Power supply board: 
It takes the 120vac 60Hz and converts it to high voltage DC (around 160~170vdc filtered by the 80~150uf
250~450vdc cap) by the bridge rectifiers to be used by the switching power supply circuits that converts
this DC voltage into high frequency (around 50~100 KHz) AC for driving the step down transformer. 


The outputs (usually 2 outputs) of the transformer will be rectified by the diodes to produce the regulated 5vdc
for the logic board, and regulated 12~20vdc (12vdc is usually for screen up to 17inch, 16~24vdc for
18~24 inch screen).

The power supply circuits are always on (unless the monitor uses the power switch that actually
disconnects the power from the outlet which is rarely used these days) which means that it is running
24/7 using the monitor or not, any spikes and surge will be fed into the monitor power supply.

Common problems: 
Blown fuses, bad caps (leaking/bulging tops or bottom seals, please note that bad cap may look normal
but it can have high ESR (Equivalent Series Resistance). The DC filter cap should be low ESR type for
using in the switching power supply; general purpose electrolytic types will not last very long in switching
power supply circuits. Poor solder joints, over heated components.

Testing:
Plug the monitor in but do not activate the power switch so the backlight inverter circuits will be off. Check
the 5vdc and the 12~24vdc to make sure they are OK. They should be tested with the load, you can use
6V 1A (6watts) lamp for the 5vdc, and car lamps such as 1157 (12v 8watts lo/26watts high) turn signal
brake lamp using high filament connection for testing the 12~18vdc (or use two 1157 in series for
19~24vdc) for the backlight inverter circuits.  


If the power supplies are working, the output voltages should be steady at the rated voltages. The power
supply will go into shut down if it detects too much current draw due to false in the power supply or short
circuits in the backlight inverter or in the logic board.

2) The backlight inverter circuits:
It takes the 12~24vdc and converts it to high frequency AC to drive the inverter transformers CCFL (Cold
Cathode Fluorescent Lamp) assemblies. The transformers will drive the CCFL by applying the start up
voltage (around 1500~2000v), when the CCFL start conducting, the voltage will drop down to about
500~800v. 


The inverter has detection circuits to detect open circuit if the lamp is not attached or does not fire up after
the start up voltage is applied, it will go into shut down. It will also shut down if the lamps draw too much
current due to ages (when lamp gets old it will draw more current). 


The inverter gets two signals from the logic board, one is the backlight ON/OFF signal, the other one is
the Dimming signal for the lamps. 


Common problems:
Bad filter caps, resonant caps (in the inverter output circuits), blown transistors/IC, shorted or open
transformer winding.
Testing:
You should have spare lamps for testing the inverter circuits. You can get lamps from www.lcdparts.net

3) Logic board:
The logic board get the signals from the VGA (ANALOG) or DVI (DIGITAL) and processes them and feed
them to the LCD panel T-CON (Timing Controller) board on the back of the LCD panel.
It also sends out two signals (backlight ON/OFF and Dimming) to the inverter circuits when the monitor is
on and getting the signals from the PC. 


If the logic board does not get the signal from the PC, it will put monitor into standby mode.
The 5vdc feeding it is converted to 3.3v, 1.8vdc by the switching buck converters to run the processor.
The logic board also sends the 5vd or 12vdc power for the T-CON board, if the voltage is not there, you
will see white/grey glowing screen only.  


Not much repair you can do on the logic board unless you have the full service manual and surface
mount repair station.

4) CCFL and Inverter circuits testing:
If you don not have the inverter and lamp tester boxes (see www.lcdparts.net), you may be able to do a
simple test by using these steps: 


If the screen flashes on for a second, you can disconnect all the lamp connectors and connect it into one
of the transformer output connector and see if you will see the flash on the screen, if you do, then try it
with another transformer output connector to see if it also get the flash on the screen.  


Repeat the procedure with other 3 lamps. If all the lamps do flash on for seconds then more likely the
lamps are OK. If lamp only flash on one of the transformer output then you will know that the problem in
that transformer inverter circuits. 


If none of the lamps flash at all then the problem is in the inverter circuits, power supply, or not getting the
on signal from the logic board.


Why this is important?

Forums are all over the web. Some questions, get answer, some just neglected at all and the problem is you don't know the reasons. You know how to ask questions at the right time and in the right place just isn't enough when asking a question in forums, but it should be followed by the proper way so that interested forum members read it and answer the questions.


My first experience when ask something that mainly related to electronics forums made me realize something. It needs a few key points to get answered in a forum. The thread I created had a response a bit because I didn't figure out in advance.

Have you ever neglected in a forum when asking a question and no one answers it? Pissed Off? Actually, there are certain rules, procedures and reasons to do so. We cannot hope to instantly get the correct answer that quickly.

Members of the forum that you visit might be a busy man/woman so they didn't get to see all the threads and ignore the perceived less important questions.
We have to apply below steps before asking the questions in the forum. So are you ready?

Here is the reasons you didn't get answer in forum:

 

1. Make sure the answer of questions you are going to ask are not on the web or if the asnwers are on the web like Google, there may be technical or language barriers that are less understood. Try using Google Translate to translate it. If the results of translating less satisfying, try to explain clearly and fully in your question.

2. Try looking for a guide on your question, just maybe there's a manual somewhere.

3. Be sure to read the FAQ (Frequently Asked Questions) before ask and do a search in the forum. If the question was not asked on the forum you can ask it directly with a new thread.

4. Do a thorough search on Google or other search engines such as Yahoo to research these questions. Don't make yourself look ignorance and just want to get a rapid and easy answer without doing nothing.

5. We can do a discussion or ask a friend with email or mailing list, maybe they could give the answer.

6. At the time of the answer you're looking for is still not obtained after all efforts that said above, create a thread about your questions and explain in detail what we have done and the results we get.

7. Use a clear and bright picture if you would like to inquire about specific parts of the picture, do not use a camera that can't deliver maximum results in our picture.

The last thing might sound funny because my English is any less good, but needs to be emphasized when asking a question is try to make grammar, spelling and punctuation were rendered correctly.
Do your best even though our native language we're not English. Once you ask a question in the forum, don't be in a hurry to get the answer. Not everyone has a lot of free time.

I've seen someone make a question with multiple threads at the same time, they are impatient and want to get the answer immediately, of course this is not allowed. That's likely irritating people.

Learn about the forum that we entered. If you sign in to a television technician forum, do not make a thread title like "I NEED HELP!"or "PLEASE HELP ME!" Don't blame me if no one answered you.

In some forums there are provisions to include the name and model of the device you're question. Do with specific and clearly as "LG Flatron LCD Monitor Model L178WSS Shutdown Intermittenly". Just sit down sweetly and I'm sure this question will be answered within a relative short time.

Note the sentence do you use when used to designate a component, do not use words such as "That big capacitor". Better to use a more specific wording and details like "One capacitor 2200uF on + 5V trace"

Open minded and making it clear that you are able and willing to help in the process of developing the solution for yourself. When they suggest to read the manual or datasheet, do and give follow-up question if there are still less understood. Lastly, do what you need to do first before asking a question.

This article is not limited to electronics forums only, we can use the basic guidelines in this article to other forums so we can get answered in forum immediately. Don't forget to read how to use light bulb trick.

Have fun and thanks for coming here.





Why this is important?

Forums are all over the web. Some questions, get answer, some just neglected at all and the problem is you don't know the reasons. You know how to ask questions at the right time and in the right place just isn't enough when asking a question in forums, but it should be followed by the proper way so that interested forum members read it and answer the questions.


My first experience when ask something that mainly related to electronics forums made me realize something. It needs a few key points to get answered in a forum. The thread I created had a response a bit because I didn't figure out in advance.

Have you ever neglected in a forum when asking a question and no one answers it? Pissed Off? Actually, there are certain rules, procedures and reasons to do so. We cannot hope to instantly get the correct answer that quickly.

Members of the forum that you visit might be a busy man/woman so they didn't get to see all the threads and ignore the perceived less important questions.
We have to apply below steps before asking the questions in the forum. So are you ready?

Here is the reasons you didn't get answer in forum:

 

1. Make sure the answer of questions you are going to ask are not on the web or if the asnwers are on the web like Google, there may be technical or language barriers that are less understood. Try using Google Translate to translate it. If the results of translating less satisfying, try to explain clearly and fully in your question.

2. Try looking for a guide on your question, just maybe there's a manual somewhere.

3. Be sure to read the FAQ (Frequently Asked Questions) before ask and do a search in the forum. If the question was not asked on the forum you can ask it directly with a new thread.

4. Do a thorough search on Google or other search engines such as Yahoo to research these questions. Don't make yourself look ignorance and just want to get a rapid and easy answer without doing nothing.

5. We can do a discussion or ask a friend with email or mailing list, maybe they could give the answer.

6. At the time of the answer you're looking for is still not obtained after all efforts that said above, create a thread about your questions and explain in detail what we have done and the results we get.

7. Use a clear and bright picture if you would like to inquire about specific parts of the picture, do not use a camera that can't deliver maximum results in our picture.

The last thing might sound funny because my English is any less good, but needs to be emphasized when asking a question is try to make grammar, spelling and punctuation were rendered correctly.
Do your best even though our native language we're not English. Once you ask a question in the forum, don't be in a hurry to get the answer. Not everyone has a lot of free time.

I've seen someone make a question with multiple threads at the same time, they are impatient and want to get the answer immediately, of course this is not allowed. That's likely irritating people.

Learn about the forum that we entered. If you sign in to a television technician forum, do not make a thread title like "I NEED HELP!"or "PLEASE HELP ME!" Don't blame me if no one answered you.

In some forums there are provisions to include the name and model of the device you're question. Do with specific and clearly as "LG Flatron LCD Monitor Model L178WSS Shutdown Intermittenly". Just sit down sweetly and I'm sure this question will be answered within a relative short time.

Note the sentence do you use when used to designate a component, do not use words such as "That big capacitor". Better to use a more specific wording and details like "One capacitor 2200uF on + 5V trace"

Open minded and making it clear that you are able and willing to help in the process of developing the solution for yourself. When they suggest to read the manual or datasheet, do and give follow-up question if there are still less understood. Lastly, do what you need to do first before asking a question.

This article is not limited to electronics forums only, we can use the basic guidelines in this article to other forums so we can get answered in forum immediately. Don't forget to read how to use light bulb trick.

Have fun and thanks for coming here.





I always wonder the uses of zero ohms resistor, maybe you had too. As we know resistor were used in circuits simply just to oppose the flow of electrical current. It has the value that determined by the color of band on resistor body. You may not need this resistor when building the circuits on the breadboard, but sometimes we could find this zero ohms resistor in commercial circuit such a microcontroller circuit.
Why Zero Ohms Resistor
Picture by Wikipedia
Zero ohms resistor can be a wire wound type or surface mount type; it all depends on the boards. Any type could be adapted to the circuit as long as it does the job well. Keep in mind, this resistor different with current sense resistor since this current sense resistor attached to “sense” the amount of current being used by the load.
Why Zero Ohm Resistor?
Picture by Wikipedia
 Most of zero ohms resistor is available in 1/4Watt and 1/8Watt power rating, and generally marked with a single black band. Due to the fact resistor has a tolerance value. In other word, it still has some internal resistance which is very small like as 0.005ohms and it can be neglected at all.


Why zero ohms resistor used on circuits?

No exact answer for this as it depends on variety reasons. Why we don’t just use a common jumper wire like we do on breadboard since it's just like a simple “conductor”?
There are many reasons behind this question.

The common reasons are:
1.    Most of manufactures use a machine that automatically inserts the components on the boards. That is not an easy job to produce a thousand even a million boards manually. In some cases, they need to connect two points on the printed circuit board and the downside is an automatic machine couldn’t “grasp” the jumper wires. Please never imagine manufactures will insert the jumper wires manually. The other reason is the two points that connected with zero ohms resistor could be used as a test point to measure the current during development and testing.

2.   The engineers have a plan to change the resistor if devices don’t work as their calculation. This will give a flexibility to remove that zero ohms resistor and use more reliable components on printed circuit board.

3.    Saving cost, yes you hear it right. The printed circuit board, especially single sided board is much cheaper than double sided board and that is one of reason to use this resistor as a jumper wire. Double sided board uses a vias to connect the traces and it can’t be applied to a single side board.

4.    For a good looking printed circuit board. The circuit board needs to look neat and inability to connect some points on PCB due to other circuit paths make the designers have to use this zero ohms resistor as well.

Well, at least the circuit boards are still working well and we don’t have a problem with zero ohms resistor. Electronics just like a puzzle and it was fun to learn all about that. If you have some thought, I would like to hear from you.

Thanks for coming here!


 

I always wonder the uses of zero ohms resistor, maybe you had too. As we know resistor were used in circuits simply just to oppose the flow of electrical current. It has the value that determined by the color of band on resistor body. You may not need this resistor when building the circuits on the breadboard, but sometimes we could find this zero ohms resistor in commercial circuit such a microcontroller circuit.
Why Zero Ohms Resistor
Picture by Wikipedia
Zero ohms resistor can be a wire wound type or surface mount type; it all depends on the boards. Any type could be adapted to the circuit as long as it does the job well. Keep in mind, this resistor different with current sense resistor since this current sense resistor attached to “sense” the amount of current being used by the load.
Why Zero Ohm Resistor?
Picture by Wikipedia
 Most of zero ohms resistor is available in 1/4Watt and 1/8Watt power rating, and generally marked with a single black band. Due to the fact resistor has a tolerance value. In other word, it still has some internal resistance which is very small like as 0.005ohms and it can be neglected at all.


Why zero ohms resistor used on circuits?

No exact answer for this as it depends on variety reasons. Why we don’t just use a common jumper wire like we do on breadboard since it's just like a simple “conductor”?
There are many reasons behind this question.

The common reasons are:
1.    Most of manufactures use a machine that automatically inserts the components on the boards. That is not an easy job to produce a thousand even a million boards manually. In some cases, they need to connect two points on the printed circuit board and the downside is an automatic machine couldn’t “grasp” the jumper wires. Please never imagine manufactures will insert the jumper wires manually. The other reason is the two points that connected with zero ohms resistor could be used as a test point to measure the current during development and testing.

2.   The engineers have a plan to change the resistor if devices don’t work as their calculation. This will give a flexibility to remove that zero ohms resistor and use more reliable components on printed circuit board.

3.    Saving cost, yes you hear it right. The printed circuit board, especially single sided board is much cheaper than double sided board and that is one of reason to use this resistor as a jumper wire. Double sided board uses a vias to connect the traces and it can’t be applied to a single side board.

4.    For a good looking printed circuit board. The circuit board needs to look neat and inability to connect some points on PCB due to other circuit paths make the designers have to use this zero ohms resistor as well.

Well, at least the circuit boards are still working well and we don’t have a problem with zero ohms resistor. Electronics just like a puzzle and it was fun to learn all about that. If you have some thought, I would like to hear from you.

Thanks for coming here!


 

Back to Top